United States History

 

States

Picture
The 'United States'
Of the 50 states, only 48 are considered "continental".  That is, 48 of the 50 states comprise the physical entity that is often considered the "United States".  The other two states, namely Alaska and Hawaii, lie off in the Pacific Ocean.  Although, they are not together.  Alaska is much farther north and borders Canada, whereas Hawaii is farther south and is an island.  Do you know what an island is?  Hawaii is an island.  Yes, that is correct.  Hawaii is an island. 

Each of the 50 states has a "state capital" and each "state capital" has a different name than any other.  For example, the capital of Colorado is Carson City but the capital of Pennsylvania is Harrisburg.  Think that is confusing?  Try multiplying those two capitals..by 25!  That will give you 50 different state capitals to memorize.  In America, the task of memorizing state capitals is often emphasized during a child's elementary years either at school or at home and is often taught by singing a song or by fun family quiz drills at dinner.

Though there is not much debate over which was the last state to ratify the constitution, some people do not know which state it was.  The answer is Rhode Island (capital: Providence).

Click here for a complete list of the 50 United States.

Of the 50 states, only 48 are considered "continental".  That is, 48 of the 50 states comprise the physical entity that is often considered the "United States".  The other two states, namely Alaska and Hawaii, lie off in the Pacific Ocean.  Although, they are not together.  Alaska is much farther north and borders Canada, whereas Hawaii is farther south and is an island.  Do you know what an island is?  Hawaii is an island.  Yes, that is correct.  Hawaii is an island. 

Each of the 50 states has a "state capital" and each "state capital" has a different name than any other.  For example, the capital of Colorado is Carson City but the capital of Pennsylvania is Harrisburg.  Think that is confusing?  Try multiplying those two capitals..by 25!  That will give you 50 different state capitals to memorize.  In America, the task of memorizing state capitals is often emphasized during a child's elementary years either at school or at home and is often taught by singing a song or by fun family quiz drills at dinner.

Though there is not much debate over which was the last state to ratify the constitution, some people do not know which state it was.  The answer is Rhode Island (capital: Providence).

Why 50 States?...And Other Questions

Picture
Curious student
Why 50 states?  That's a great question.  And while there is no simple answer, historians generally agree on this: there are 50 states because of the round number.  That is, it's simple, clean, half of 100 - a great number.  


But why are some of the states bigger than others?  Well, think of it like humans.  Not all humans are the same size, right?  For example, your uncle might be taller than you, or you  might have a girlfriend who is shorter than you.  Whatever the case, most things in life come in different shapes and sizes.  Try to think of an item that comes in one consistent size.  If you think of any, it is likely that they are manufactured on some sort of assembly line.  But aside from those items, things in life often vary in size and that is the same with U.S. States.